Accounting

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting (4) (4, 2)

This course introduces basic accounting principles and business concepts as they apply to reporting the financial and economic data of a business. The course emphasizes recording, analysis, and interpretation of daily business transactions and other economic events that affect the business. This course serves as the basis for subsequent accounting courses. This course has an additional laboratory of two hours per week.

Prerequisite: MAT 101; Co-requisite: CIS115 for AAS Accounting students only.

ACC 161 Financial Accounting (4) (4, 2)

This course introduces financial accounting concepts to measure business activity and teaches how to prepare financial reports in order to gain an understanding of the financial condition and profitability of a business. The course content emphasizes the accounting of current and long-term assets and liabilities, characteristics of corporations, stock transactions and dividends, statement of cash flow and financial statement analysis. This course has an additional laboratory of two hours per week.

Prerequisite: ACC 101 and CIS 115 or departmental approval for Business majors

ACC 162 Managerial Accounting (4) (4, 1)

This course introduces managerial accounting concepts to produce accounting information for management planning, control and decision making. Managerial accounting information is designed to meet the specific needs of company’s management team. Managers need to make numerous decisions during the day-to-day operations of a business and managerial accounting is designed to provide data to help make those decisions and plan for the future. This course has an additional laboratory of one hour per week.

Prerequisite: ACC 161

ACC 201 Intermediate Accounting I (4) (4, 2)

This course presents the development, usefulness and limitations of general financial accounting theory, with major emphasis on financial statement presentation and analysis, and valuation of asset and liability accounts. It includes a study of monetary assets and liabilities, inventories, plant assets, and present value techniques.

Prerequisite: ACC 162

ACC 202 Intermediate Accounting (4) (4, 2)

This course integrates a deeper knowledge of accounting with the logic required to make business decisions. Students will be able to prepare statements of cash flow and understand the primary activities of a business, as well as, accounting disclosures. Students will integrate technical and practical knowledge as part of an accounting career.

Prerequisite: ACC 201

ACC 260 Tax Accounting (4) (4, 0)

This course introduces the principles and procedures of federal tax laws as related to the single proprietorships, partnerships and corporations. Students will be introduced to tax forms and will master skills in tax laws, tax preparation, and planning.

Prerequisite: ACC 161

ACC 301 Hospitality Accounting (4, 0)

This course introduces specialized hospitality accounting areas of hotel revenue and expenses, inventory accounting, property and hospitality equipment; payroll accounting and hospitality special financial statements; the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flow; analysis of financial statements; short-term and annual financial reports; budgeting expenses reports; forecasting reports; and an analysis of financial reports for decision-making. Prerequisite: ACC 101

ADS 253 Introduction and Basics of Addiction in Social and Family Environments (4) (4, 0)

This course will provide students with a basic understanding needed to identify and explain bio-psycho-social etiology of addictive disorders and associated social and mental health problems. The specific focus is the impact addiction has on children, families, and communities. Students will learn about the history of addictions treatment. They are introduced to common models used to understand addiction, prevention, and treatment in a social and family context (disease model, ecological model, recovery model, etc.). A basic orientation to DSM diagnostic categories of addictions is provided to understand how diagnosis impacts access to treatment. Regulatory and ethical codes that impact practice are reviewed. Policies and systems that influence resources for Substance Use Disorders and addictions are presented with a focus on how to advocate on behalf of children and families at risk due to addiction. Students will learn about alcohol and drug counseling ADS a specialty within other professions such as social work, addictions, and behavioral sciences. Students will be required to interview a family impacted by addiction for this course. (Formerly ADC 252)

Prerequisite: ENG 162, BIO 102 or CHM 115.

Co-requisite: PSY 101, SOC 101 (highly recommended) or PSY 210.

ADS 256 Basics of Prevention of Addictive Disorders (4) (4, 0)

This course provides students with an overview of evidence based research on the incidence and prevalence of addictions. Students will review case studies to understand research on the risk and protective factors for addiction. Students will understand change ADS a process of engagement, intervention, and evaluation. They will learn basic empowerment and motivational interviewing techniques to engage families, children, and parents impacted by addictions. The DSM-V diagnostic system for Addictive Disorders and co – occurring mental health disorders, on which medical treatment is based, is used to study its impact on services. Students will identify community resources for addiction, including the levels of care used in addiction treatment. Students will learn to identify addiction problems using engagement, addiction assessment and intake questions, bio-psycho-social history taking, and determination of levels of care needed. Discharge and aftercare planning and relapse management concepts are presented in two models: a medical model and the recovery/empowerment model. Students will interview a policy maker or influential provider to discuss the impact of state, local, or national policies on addiction prevention. (Formerly: ADC 255)

Prerequisite: ENG 162, BIO 102 or CHM 115, PSY 101, SOC 101 (highly recommended) or PSY 210.

Co-requisite: ADS 300

ADS 300 Planning Changes That Support Addiction Recovery and Prevention Throughout Human Development (4) (4, 0)

This course provides students with an ecological understanding of the impact of Substance Use Disorders on child and adult development. It is an introductory practice course that teaches multilevel intervention techniques to address the needs of families and communities who are impacted by addictions and other related social issues such as crime, poverty, education/occupational opportunity, and cultural bias. Evidence based counseling techniques and empowerment strategies to assist families and communities are taught. Cultural factors and family dynamics that influence addiction treatment, recovery, and relapse are explored. The significance and potential influence of a strong recovery community is understood. Students are encouraged to volunteer in organizations serving families with addiction such as shelters, etc. Students in this course will select an area of independent interest related to addiction and will conduct a short literature review to learn in greater depth. (Formerly: ADC 262)

Prerequisite: ENG 162, BIO 102 or CHM 115, PSY 101, SOC 101 (highly recommended) or PSY 210.

Co-requisite: ADS 256.

ADM 101 Keyboarding & Document Formatting (4) (4, 2)

This course introduces keyboarding and control techniques with the objective of mastering keyboarding skills in formatting and typing business documents such as memorandums, business letters, reports, research papers, and manipulation of tables. Students will learn basic and intermediate concepts of Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, introduction to Windows Operating System, shortcut keys, and basic Internet skills and E-mail systems. Proofreading, editing, and language usage are also covered. (Formerly: SES 101)

ADM 105 Advanced Document Formatting (4) (4, 3)

This course combines instruction in Microsoft Office using Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Access and emphasizes critical thinking skills using up to date software features. Students receive instruction embedding data and linking and combining documents as they gain hands-on training including the completion of real world office projects. This course will prepare students to take the Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (MCAS) exam to meet the demands of the business world. (Formerly: SES 105)

Prerequisite: ADM 101

Course fee: This course carries a fee. See Bursar’s office

ADM 210 Desktop Publishing & PowerPoint (4) (4, 0)

This course builds on the concepts learned in ADM 101 and ADM 105 with emphasis on more advanced topics. The course will introduce students to the use of desktop publishing software and offers hands-on instruction to merge text and graphics created with other software programs — to produce word-processed documents, booklets, and other office-standard documents in a professional layout and typeset quality. It also provides practical application of brochures, flyers, newsletters, invoices, and business cards. This course will prepare students to take the Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (MCAS) exam in PowerPoint. (Formerly: SES 210)

Prerequisite: ADM 101, recommended Co-requisite: ADM 105

Course fee: This course carries a fee. See Bursar’s office

ADM 230 Office Procedures (4) (4, 0)

This course trains students in the functions of the modern business office. Virtual and global offices are emphasized. Topics include telephone techniques, written correspondence, business meetings, travel arrangements, office mail, file management, and career planning and business ethics. Students are required to demonstrate their skills and knowledge through the development of a professional portfolio. (Formerly: SES 230)

Prerequisite: ADM 105, Co-requisite: ADM 210

ADM 250 Business Communications (4) (4, 0)

This course focuses on the means of effective business communication within a professional setting. The course emphasizes both written and oral communication. Topics include proper planning, composing and completing of business correspondence such as letters, memorandums, e-mails, and facsimiles. The fundamentals of English grammar and established standards of language usage will be reviewed. Telephone usage is covered as is enhancement of presentation skills used to develop good oral communication skills. Psychological and physical factors within the office environment, interpersonal relations, problem solving techniques, and how to make independent decisions are also explored. Students also will learn how to fill out standard employment documents and practice interviewing skills. (Formerly: SES 250)

Prerequisite: ENG 160

AHP 110 Applied Physics in Respiratory Care (3) (3, 0)

This course studies the basic principles of physics with emphasis in states of matter, change of state, gas behavior under changing conditions and fluids dynamics. Included in this course are theoretical concepts of acid-base balance, humidity therapy and aerosol drug therapy.

Prerequisites: BIO 108, CHM 115, MAT 110 and ENG 160.

AHP 113 Respiratory Care Pharmacology (3) (3, 0)

General pharmacological principles and their applications to cardio-pulmonary disease to include: pharmacological agents that affect the pulmonary, cardiac and renal systems. The methods of drug administration, effects, hazards and contraindications will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: BIO 108, CHM 115, MAT 110, and ENG 160

BIO 101 Introduction to Biology (4) (3, 2)

This course covers the basic principles and concepts of biology and provides general considerations of biological processes, including how organisms reproduce and inherit, how life on earth evolved and how present-day organisms relate to each other. IAI Course Number: L1 900L

BIO 102 Introduction to Human Biology (4) (3, 2)

This course covers basic principles and concepts of biology, evolution, nutrition behavior, anatomy, and physiology applied to human beings including the life cycle from conception through birth, adulthood, aging, and death. Laboratory exercises include microscopic observations, chemistry of organic molecules, and cell structure and function. IAI Course Number: L1 904L

BIO 108 Anatomy and Physiology I (4) (3, 2)

Introduction to the human body, human organization, maintenance of the body with emphasis on the cardiovascular, respiratory, nervous, muscular and skeletal systems. Laboratory exercises include microscopic observations, chemistry of the organic molecules, cell structure and function, microscopic study of tissues, blood typing and others. This is an intensive course designed for Respiratory Therapy students. BIO 102 is the alternative for non-Respiratory Therapy majors. IAI Course Number: L1 904L

BIO 115 Introduction to Medical Terminology (4) (4, 0)

This course is an introduction to the medical language. Previous medical background is unnecessary. This course is offered to those students who want to learn the basics of medical terminology and understand the body and its function.

BIO 120 Introduction to Microbiology (4) (3, 2)

This course introduces the student to the microbial world, molecular biology, physiology and metabolism of microorganisms, immunobiology and infectious diseases as well as the relationships between humans and microorganisms. Laboratory practice included.

Prerequisites: BIO 108 and CHM 115

BIO 199 Topics in Anatomy and Physiology I (1)

Independent study. This course will review the basic principles and concepts studied in the BIO-108 class with special emphasis in the respiratory, cardiovascular, renal and nervous systems. This course is offered on request.

Prerequisite: BIO 108

BIO 208 Cardio-Pulmonary Anatomy and Physiology (4) (3, 2)

An intensive study of physiological and structural functions of the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. Special emphasis in mechanics of ventilation, control of ventilation, gas diffusion, ventilation-perfusion relationships, acid-base regulation and cardio-pulmonary hemodynamics. Laboratory includes patient assessment, pulmonary function measurements, thoracic imaging and E.K.G.

Prerequisites: BIO 108, CHM 115, MAT 110, and ENG 160

BUS 110 Introduction to Business (4) (4, 0)

This course introduces the concepts of modern US business including analyzing organizations and types of businesses, business functions and operations, roles played by business and consumers in our economy, different types of economic systems in the world, and the role of the manager in business and society.

Prerequisite: MAT 101 IAI Course Number: BUS 911

BUS 220 Principles of Management (4) (4, 0)

This course introduces the concepts and principles of management. The course covers the management functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, controlling the evolution of management function through the years, the management role in all business operations, and management ethics and social responsibilities.

Prerequisite: BUS 110

BUS 231 Principles of Marketing (4) (4, 0)

This course introduces the concepts and functions of the marketing process. The course covers areas related to the supply of industrial and consumer goods, the role of the consumer, the product, the market, pricing policies, promotion, and distribution methods. This course provides a comprehensive overview of a marketing system and how marketing decisions are made.

Prerequisite: BUS 110

BUS 280 Legal Environment of Business (4) (4, 0)

This course introduces the legal aspects, social environment and government regulations that influence the way business is conducted in the U.S.A. The course covers areas related to anti-trust laws, mergers and acquisitions, securities regulations, consumer protection law, labor and employment laws, environmental regulations, product liability, torts and business ethics.

Prerequisite: BUS 110

CHM 115 Basic Chemistry (4) (3, 2)

Basic principles and concepts of general chemistry and properties and classification of matter, basic chemical calculations, the metric system, gas laws, acid-base theory. This course is offered to those students in the pre-professional field and allied health professions. The course includes lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisite: MAT 110 or MAT 112 IAI Course Number: P1 902L

CHM 199 Topics in Chemistry (1)

Independent study. This course will review the basic principles and concepts studied in the CHM-115 class with special emphasis on concepts of general chemistry, the metric system, and basic chemical calculations. This course is offered on request.

Prerequisite: CHM 115

CHM 211 General Chemistry I (5) (4, 2)

Introduction to general inorganic chemistry, including stoichiometry, concentration units, gas, laws, atomic structure, bonding, periodic laws, states of matter, solutions, acid-base theories, rate, equilibrium, and oxidation-reduction theory. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisite: CHM 115

CIS 102 Introduction to Computer Information Systems (4) (3, 0)

This course is a general introduction to computer information systems. It introduces the latest hardware, software, and trends in the computer field, as well as functional procedures and personnel related to computer information systems. Students will also learn the use of the Internet and software packages, including word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation software, and computer programming concepts. Laboratory exercises provide students with experience in the use of computers.

Prerequisite/Co-requisite: MAT 101

CIS 103 Computer Logic and Programming (4) (4, 0)

This course introduces the computer logic and programming techniques to solve business-related problems. Students will learn how to identify the problem, how to design a solution algorithm, and how to prove the algorithm’s correctness. Also, the course will introduce the use of problem-solving aids such as pseudo code, flowcharts, hierarchy charts, decision tables, module design, structured programming, and object oriented design methodology. Students also will use programming-logic concepts to program several simple programs.

Prerequisites: CIS 102 and MAT 112or department consent

CIS 106 Database Applications (4) (3, 0)

This course provides an introduction to database concepts and techniques and offers hands-on instruction in designing and programming databases using a microcomputer database management package. Students will learn the procedures to write and generate printed reports, interactive queries and screen formats for typical business applications. This course will prepare students to take the Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (MCAS) exam in Access. Recommended only for ADM major.

Prerequisite: MAT 101 and (CIS 102 or CIS 115 or ADM 101)

Course fee: This course carries a fee. See Bursar’s office

CIS 109 Computer Literacy for Cooks (2) (2, 0)

This course introduces computer terminology and computer concepts to students in the culinary arts programs. The course will provide students with the basic concepts in the use of Internet and software packages, including Word Processing, Excel and PowerPoint.

Prerequisite: None, Co-requisite MAT 109

CIS 110 Introduction to Object Oriented Programming (4) (4, 2)

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of a computer system, computer logic, and computer programming. The course introduces the methodology of structured programming as well as an introduction to object oriented concepts. The emphasis of the course will be on the syntax and semantics of the Java language, including data types, operators, control structures, functions, arrays, and file processing. Also, the course will present basic object oriented design (OOD) using a simplified Unified Modeling Language (UML) to help the novice programmer. The course has an additional laboratory of two hours per week.

Prerequisite/Co-requisite: MAT 112.

CIS 115 Spreadsheets for Business (4) (3, 0)

This course introduces spreadsheet concepts and techniques from a business perspective. Students learn how to enter and edit a worksheet, create formulas, perform formatting, utilize functions, manipulate worksheets, and create a variety of charts to generate professional reports for decision making. Also, the course will introduce financial functions, PivotTables, data validation functions, macros, and software integration with databases and other applications. This course will prepare students to take the Microsoft Certified Applications Specialist (MCAS) exam in Excel. Certification is recommended only for ADM majors. (Formerly: CIS 105 Microcomputer Applications.)

Prerequisite: MAT 101

Course fee: This course carries a fee. See Bursar’s office

CIS 130 Microcomputer Hardware Systems (4) (4, 2)

This course introduces the major computer hardware components, I/O devices, and peripheral devices. The course will concentrate not only on the newest hardware and operating system, but also on older technology still in use today. This course has a laboratory where students will gain hands-on experience in hardware installation, maintenance, troubleshooting, and system performance optimization. Also, as part of this course, two important topics will be introduced: Operating System installation, administration and troubleshooting, and basic network concepts. This course has an additional laboratory of two hours per week.

CIS 203 Discrete Structures (4) (4, 0)

This course introduces the fundamental number theoretic, logical, algorithmic, combinatory, and computational concepts from discrete structures and their applications to computer information systems. The course introduces and analyzes a variety of applications related to computer science and computer information systems. This is not a programming course.

Prerequisite/Co-requisite: MAT 112 or MAT 160

CIS 210 Object Oriented Programming II (4) (4, 2)

This course is a continuation of CIS 110 and introduces more advanced object oriented topics such as derived classes, multiple inheritance, polymorphism, abstract classes, class templates, advanced data structures, and the use of object libraries. Students will use the object oriented methodology to design, code, test, debug, and document advanced computer applications. The course has an additional laboratory of two hours per week.

Prerequisites: MAT 112 and CIS 110

CIS 212 Visual Basic Programming (4) (4, 2)

This course presents the student to visual basic programming language and program structure. Topics include program development and design, visual and procedure-oriented programming, form design, structured programming, event-driven programming using objects, interactive processing, arrays processing, subroutines, concepts of file store and retrieval, and introduction to access and maintain a relational database. This course has additional laboratory of two hours per week.

Prerequisites: MAT 112 and CIS 110

CIS 216 Operating Systems (4) (4, 2)

This course presents an overview of the concepts of operating systems. Topics include: file systems, processor scheduling, memory management, device management, interrupt handling, and distributed systems. No single operating systems will be used to cover these topics. This course has a laboratory component where students will gain hands-on experience installing, operating, administrating, and troubleshooting techniques using Windows XP operating system. This course has additional laboratory of two hours per week.

Prerequisite: CIS 130

CIS 217 Network Concepts (4) (4, 2)

This course introduces the fundamentals of data communications, with emphasis on local area networks. The course overviews all layers of the OSI model and TCP/IP protocols. Also, the course covers networking media, sharing hardware and software resources, and network services. Students will obtain hands-on experience in a computer laboratory by building, administrating, and troubleshooting a local area network. This course has additional laboratory of two hours per week.

Prerequisite: CIS 130

CIS 227 Advanced Network Concepts (4) (4, 2)

This course presents the concepts of router configuration and protocols, maintenance and troubleshooting and introduces the fundamental network security in today’s network communications. Students will examine routers as they are among the most common network infrastructure devices used in LANs and WANs and why they play an important role in network security. Students also will learn about TCP/IP protocols in order to test and secure networks using real traffic management scenarios. This course has an additional laboratory of two hours per week.

Prerequisites: CIS 217 and CIS 216

CIS 228 Network Security (4) (4, 2)

This course presents the concepts of router configuration and protocols, maintenance and troubleshooting, and then focuses on the fundamental network security in today’s network environment. Students will examine routers as they are among the most common network infrastructure devices used in LANs and WANs and why they play in important role in network security. Students also will learn about TCP/IP protocols in order to test and secure networks using real traffic management scenarios. This course has an additional laboratory of two hours per week. This course substitutes for CIS 227.

Prerequisite: CIS 217

CIS 250 Web Design and Programming (4) (4, 2)

This course introduces the essentials of Web design and planning techniques to develop effective and functional websites. The course will teach students how to design websites with creative interfaces, strong graphic images, functional site organization and logical navigation. Students will use web-authoring software to create web pages, with an introduction to program with HTML. This course has an additional laboratory of two hours per week.

Prerequisites: MAT 112 and CIS 110

CIS 255 Server-Side Web Development (4) (4, 2)

This course continues with the concepts learned in the previous course on web design and programming techniques and introduces the basics of design, coding and scripting, and database connectivity to develop web-based applications. The course uses Visual Basic.Net as the primary language.

Prerequisite: CIS 250

CIS 270 Management Information Systems (4) (4, 1)

This course introduces computer-based information systems from a managerial perspective and stresses the important role information technology play to satisfy business objectives. The course helps students gain real world experience in project management. Students will have the opportunity to work in teams, to take a leadership role, to manage a budget, and to manage time-on-task operations. Management software will be used to manage the team’s project. This course has an additional one hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: CIS 217 and CIS 290 for CIS students or BUS 110 for Business students.

CIS 280 Introduction to System Analysis (4) (4, 1)

This course introduces the concepts of investigation, analysis, design, implementation, and installation as they apply to the phases of a business system project. The course includes analysis of organization and procedures, forms and workflow, work distribution, and methods and effects of computerization. This course has an additional one hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: CIS 210 or CIS 212, and CIS 290

CIS 290 Database Management Concepts (4) (3, 0)

This course introduces the concepts of modern database management systems. The relational, hierarchical and network models are presented including a comprehensive coverage of SQL. The course presents the principles of database systems with a practical focus. Topics include: logical and physical schema designs, query creation, security, storing, and network approach to database management systems and database administration.

Prerequisite: CIS 110

CIS 301 Management Information Systems for Hospitality (4, 0)

This course will introduce the concepts related to Management Information Systems (MIS) in hospitality. Students will learn about the different MIS technologies and identify how they are used in the different sectors of the hospitality industry. Students will be exposed to a variety of proprietary management systems as well as distributed systems and use them for decision making. Survey of computer applications, computer products, trends, data storage, data security, and communications systems will be analyzed. Prerequisite: BUS 220

CRJ 201 Criminal Justice in the United States (4)

This introductory course covers the major topics and systems of the criminal justice system from the federal to local levels. Major areas covered are police, prosecution, courts, and correction systems. Instruction also includes content on definitions of crime and the development of the criminal justice system.

Prerequisite: None

CRJ 205 Corrections Systems and Services (4)

This course covers the development of the corrections systems in the United States, as well as the various types, purposes, and alternatives to the correctional system in society including probation and parole. Other issues will include minority over-representation in the system, abuses in the correctional system, health care, mental health, and rehabilitation vs. incarceration.

Prerequisite: CRJ 201

CRJ 211 Juvenile Justice (4)

This course examines children and juveniles in criminal justice from a multiple systems perspective, including family and community, social policy, poverty and neglect, and minority issues. Police and judicial concerns specific to child and juvenile needs will be addressed, including probation and parole.

Prerequisite: CRJ 201

CRJ 215 Procedures in Criminal Law (4)

This course presents past developments and present procedures in criminal law, including the constitutional rights of defendants as related to the laws of arrest, legal representation, evidence, courtroom and trial procedures, probation, and parole.

Prerequisite: CRJ 201

CUL 100 Food Service and Hospitality (4) (4, 0)

This course will provide students an overview of food service management. Students will be introduced to the history of food service, modern food service operations, basic nutrition, menu planning, menu analysis, menu pricing, menu design and cost controls, and cooking terminology. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline are included in this course.

Prerequisite: None

CUL 101 Introduction to Culinary Arts (4) (2, 4)

This course is an introduction to the Culinary Arts. It introduces the concepts, skills, and techniques used in professional cooking. Students learn through lectures/demonstrations basic cooking methods, basic ingredients, and basic knife skills. Students also gain skills and experience in the preparation of soups, sauces, vegetables, starches and grains. The structure and organization of a professional kitchen are also discussed.

Prerequisite: None

Course fee: This course carries a fee for utensils and uniform. Current fee may be inquired at the Bursar’s office.

CUL 103 Nutrition (4) (4, 0)

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of nutrition and their application to food preparation, menu planning, dietary requirements, and life cycle issues.

CUL 104 Garde Manger (4) (2, 4)

This course will introduce students to the basic knowledge and skills used in the cold kitchen techniques including sandwiches, canapés, appetizers, condiments and breakfast items. Students also learn how to prepare hors d’oeuvres, salads dressings, garnish, and cold sauces. Emphasis is given to planning, preparation, and production of á la carte items as served in distinguished restaurants.

Prerequisites: CUL 100 and CUL 101

CUL 105 Baking and Pastry I (4) (2, 4)

This course presents the fundamentals of baking and pastry equipment, ingredients and their functions, weights and measures. Students apply basic baking concepts, methods, and techniques to breads, desserts, and rolls.

Prerequisite: None

CUL 106 Principles and Production of Stocks, Soups and Sauces (4) (2, 4)

In this course, students acquire knowledge and skills in the preparation of stocks, soups, and sauces. Students learn the use of basic sauces and many soups. They also learn how to thicken with roux, emulsion, slurry, and reduction of sauces.

Prerequisites: CUL 100 and CUL 101

CUL 108 Fish, Shellfish, and Poultry (4) (2, 4)

Students learn the basic and advanced principles and procedures of storing, cutting, and preparing fish and shellfish.

Students also learn the fundamentals of boning and cooking techniques for poultry and game birds. Students will learn the proper techniques used in poultry cookery, such as sautéing, roasting, grilling, braising, pan-frying and deep-frying.

Prerequisites: CUL 100 and CUL 101

CUL 120 Baking and Pastry II (4) (2, 4)

This course builds on the basic understanding of baking principles learned in CUL 105. Students learn the fundamentals and methods of making pies, creams, and custards, meringues, etc. Students also learn how to create simple cakes, using a variety of techniques and methods.

Prerequisite: CUL 105

CUL 125 Baking and Pastry III (4) (2, 4)

Students taking this course gain experience baking and designing wedding cakes and other specialty cakes. The course involves learning how to ice cakes to create beautiful, aesthetic designs, complete with frosting. Students will create small, decorated cakes and more difficult cakes, such as wedding cakes, cake sculpture, gum pasta flower and gum paste figures and learn the best ways to display completed items for special presentations. Students will design a wedding cake to complete the course.

Prerequisite: CUL 120

CUL 201 Culinary Principles and Meats (4) (2, 4)

This course presents the fundamental concepts, theories, and techniques used in meat cookery. Through lectures, demonstrations, and “hands-on” practice, students learn product identification, and fabrication cuts of meats. Students will learn different cooking techniques, such as grilling, broiling, and sautéing will be learned.

Prerequisites: CUL 100 and CUL 101

CUL 231 Advanced Culinary Skills (4) (2, 4)

Beginning with fundamentals of plating, platter garnishing and table arrangements, students learn to prepare sausages, pâtés, terrines, and other cold foods. Course will include review of wine, beverages, and cheeses from around the world. Students will also learn how to set-up and organize buffets.

Prerequisites: CUL 100, CUL 104, CUL 106, and CUL 108

CUL 232 Externship/Internship Rotation (4) (2, 4)

Allows students to apply skills learned in the classroom and laboratory to on-the-job training. Students will work in a food service establishment for 300 clock hours. The internship may be extended depending on the student’s interests and work schedules and the needs of the food service establishment. The internship is offered to students depending on the availability of a food service establishment and the student’s skills development as demonstrated in the classroom and laboratory.

Prerequisites: CUL 100, CUL 104, CUL 106, and CUL 108

CUL 240 Latin America Cuisine (4) (2, 4)

This course is designed to explore the cultures and cuisines of various Latin American countries. Emphasis is placed on traditional ingredients, flavor profiles, preparation and techniques.

Prerequisites: CUL 100, CUL 104, CUL 106, and CUL 108

CUL 244 European Cuisine (4) (2, 4)

This course will focus on Italian and French cuisine. Emphasis is placed on traditional ingredients, flavor profiles, preparation and techniques.

Prerequisites: CUL 100, CUL 104, CUL 106, and CUL 108

ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (4) (4, 0)

This course provides an overview of the field of Early Childhood Education including a brief history as well as descriptions of the various types of early childhood programs and settings in the United States, while exploring theoretical, political, cultural, and economic underpinnings. State and Federal guidelines for early childhood settings are introduced. Students explore reflective thinking in terms of caring for young children in a variety of settings and circumstances. Twenty hours of observation in early childhood settings are required.

IAI Major – Course Number: ECE 911

ECE 210 Math and Science Activities for the Young Child (4) (4, 0)

This course explores the emerging concepts of math and science in relation to the developing child from infancy to age eight. Cognitive theory is explored as well as methods for teaching math and science in an early childhood setting. Students will explore a variety of activities and lesson planning methods as well as assessment tools for evaluating the teaching/learning process. The course will include dissemination of technology use in the classroom and developmentally appropriate practice. Ten hours of observing young children are required.

Co-requisite: ECE 101

ECE 212 Art and Music Activities for the Young Child (4) (4, 0)

This course provides a developmental perspective on art and music experiences in the early childhood setting. Students will explore a variety of multicultural creative activities and materials as well as techniques for planning and evaluating such processes. The course includes discussion of an integrated approach to the use of art and music experiences throughout the early childhood day. Ten hours of observing young children are required.

Co-requisite: ECE 101

ECE 215 Infants, Toddlers, and Caregivers (4) (4, 0)

This course explores overall development of the infant and toddler including physical growth, motor, language, cognitive and socio-emotional development as well as an examination of possible developmental delays. The course is influenced by the concept of relationship-based infant/toddler care particularly in terms of working with families. Multicultural issues and inclusive practices are discussed. Students are introduced to a variety developmentally appropriate planning and assessment techniques and reflective practice. This course provides information on caregiver’s role and responsibilities as they work with infant and toddlers in various types of programs. Twenty hours of observation in an infant and toddler setting are required.

Prerequisite: ECE-101

ECE 220 Health, Nutrition and Safety for the Young Child (4) (4, 0)

This course introduces standards and guidelines for promoting health, providing a safe environment and providing nutritious meals, snacks and food experiences in an early childhood setting. The course will focus on descriptions of common childhood illnesses, injuries and nutrition concerns in early childhood. Students explore various policies regarding health, safety and nutrition issues and explore various cultural components in relation to these issues. Students participate in evaluating their own health and nutrition incorporating a self-reflective philosophy throughout the course. Ten hours of observing in an early childhood setting are required.

Prerequisite: ECE 101

ECE 221 The Exceptional Child (4) (4, 0)

This course provides an introduction of the concept of exceptionality. Students will explore typical and atypical development in the physical, cognitive, language, and socio-emotional domains. This course includes strategies for identification, intervention, methods, and programs designed to meet special needs including learning disabilities. This course will also provide a study of applicable federal and state laws and requirements including the Individual with Disabilities Education Act, American with Disabilities Act, Individual Family Services Plan, Individual Education Plan, and other inclusive programs. This course fulfills requirements of Illinois School Code, Article 21-2a. Ten hours of observation are required.

Prerequisites: ECE 101, PSY 101 or PSY 210

ECE 223 Family Child Care Administration (4) (4, 0)

This course provides students with the knowledge and development of the function and documentation required to successfully open and manage their own Family Child Care Home Business. It will discuss the development of a Business Concept, Business Plan, Parent Handbook and an appropriate Budget. It will also discuss how to monitor a Family Child Care Home by implementing the Business Administration Scale for Family Child Care Homes. Fifty hours of field experience are required.

Prerequisite: ECE 101

ECE 224 Principles and Practices of Early Childhood Education (4) (4, 0)

This course provides students with an overview of theory and practice in early childhood education with particular emphasis on physical, cognitive, language, social and emotional development. The course focuses on designing a developmentally appropriate environment for young children. Students address 13 Functional Areas within six Competency Goals in accordance with guidelines set by the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition. This course involves a writing requirement in which students design extensive and specific portfolio documentation. (Formerly PSY 215) Forty hours of observation required.

Prerequisites: ECE 101 and PSY 210

ECE 225 Language Acquisition and Language Arts for Young Children (4) (4, 0)

This course explores the developmental process of language learning from birth to age eight and provides an overview of the principles governing the process. Students learn how contextual factors influence the emergence of language, including age, sex, and cultural experiences. The course emphasizes the importance of relationships and one on one conversation to the development of communication skills. Students explore a variety of planning techniques to create a literacy-rich environment for young children by incorporating early literacy experiences in every aspect of the early childhood setting. The course focuses on observation strategies to inform assessment and curricular choices in the early childhood setting. Ten hours of observation are required.

Prerequisites: ECE 101, ECE 212

ECE 226 Observation and Guidance of the Young Child (4) (4, 0)

This course explores various observation techniques and guidance strategies in the early childhood setting. Students identify child behavior as communication and consider behavior in the context of development. Students explore environmental influences on behavior such as family, culture and community. Guidance techniques are explored and examined by observation of child behavior. Students will reflect on the importance of building a relationship with families to better understand behavioral cues and choose culturally sensitive guidance techniques, which are appropriate to individual children and families in the early childhood setting. Twenty hours observations in pre-primary settings are required.

Prerequisite: ECE 101

ECE 228 Child, Family, Community (4) (4, 0)

This course emphasizes the importance of building partnerships with children and their families as well as the community and community resources. Students explore the interdependence of the developing child within the context of family, culture and community. Students will participate in reflective discussions regarding one’s own cultural and familial influences in considering future teaching practices. This course includes an in-depth look at community resources as well as providing parent education and community outreach projects. Ten hours of observations are required.

Prerequisite: ECE 101

ECE 232 Early Childhood Practicum (4) (2, 14 hours of practicum per week)

In this capstone course students explore principles and practices of early childhood education and hands-on classroom experience under the direct supervision of a qualified Supervising Teacher. Students reflect on experiences in the practicum placement and discuss various strategies for planning, observation, guidance and assessment. Students explore the concept of early childhood education as a profession while reviewing professional organizations and literature. The culminating experience involves a mock interview in which students answer questions while being videotaped. Students are required to spend 200 hours in an early childhood setting (birth to eight). At least 100 hours are to be spent in an accredited institution by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. However, if the student finds a site that is NAEYC accredited all 200 hours can be completed at the site. Students will meet weekly for a seminar class.

Prerequisite: 28 hours of ECE courses. IAI Major – Course Number: ECE 914

ECO 101 Principles of Macroeconomics (4) (4, 0)

This course introduces modern macroeconomic theory and public policy. The course also covers the economic growth and instability, fiscal policy, money, banking, monetary policy, international trade and economic issues of the developing countries. This course allows students to understand the different economic problems facing today’s society.

Prerequisite: MAT 112 IAI Course Number: S3 901

ECO 102 Principles of Microeconomics (4) (4, 0)

The course introduces the microeconomics theories and policies in relation to product markets, resource markets, microeconomics of government, and microeconomics issues and policies like antitrust policy and regulations. The course also covers why international trade is so important in today’s global economy.

Prerequisite: MAT 112 IAI Course Number: S3 902

ENG 101 Basic/Intermediate Reading, Writing, and Grammar (4) (4, 4)

Development of reading comprehension through the use of articles and stories. Students learn to read for accurate, literal comprehension, make reasonable inferences, and identify main ideas and detail. Writing practice includes sentence construction, paragraphing, punctuation, and formatting. Study skills include the use of dictionaries.

Co-requisites: ENG 104 (plus one practicum: ENG 011)

ENG 104 Basic Oral Communication (4) (4, 4)

Development of the ability to communicate in English. Students practice pronunciation, intonation, and conversation through dialogs, group discussion, and presentations on simple topics.

Co-requisites: ENG 101 (plus one practicum: ENG 014)

ENG 105 Intermediate Reading and Writing (4) (4, 2)

Further development of reading comprehension through nonfiction. Students practice reading for accurate comprehension, making reasonable inferences, and identifying main ideas and details. Writing practice includes punctuation, sentence construction, paragraphing, and summarizing.

Prerequisites: ENG 101and ENG104, or Placement Test

Co-requisites: ENG 108 (plus one practicum: ENG 015)

ENG 108 Intermediate English Grammar (4) (4, 2)

Further study and practice of English grammar, both orally and in writing. Presentation and review of tenses and syntax.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 and ENG104, or Placement Test

Co-requisite: ENG 105

ENG 109 Advanced Reading, Writing, and Grammar (4) (4, 4)

Advanced Reading Writing and Grammar ENG 109 is a bridge course in which students acquire the reading and writing skills to succeed in college transferable composition courses. Students will develop their writing and critical thinking skills, learn how to analyze texts, and they will be exposed to different types of readings including fiction and non-fiction.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 and ENG 108, or placement test

Co-requisite: Practicum (ENG 019)

ENG 121 Pre-Composition (4) (4, 4)

Development of reading comprehension skills; development and practice of writing skills including: the essay, summarizing and outlining; and use of reference materials to improve written expression.

Prerequisite: Placement Test

Co-requisite: (Practicum ENG 021)

ENG 160 Composition I (4) (4, 0)

Development of accurate reading comprehension and writing skills including descriptive, expository and persuasive essays; introduction to the research paper; development of study habits and skills including outlining, summarizing, formatting written work, and using reference materials to improve written expression.

Prerequisite: ENG 109 or ENG 121 or Placement Test

Co-requisite: EWL 001 IAI Course Number: C1 900

ENG 162 Composition II (4) (4, 0)

Development of research-based writing skills. Practice of study habits and skills including note-taking, outlining, summarizing, formatting written work, and using reference sources to document and improve written expression.

Prerequisite: ENG 160 IAI Course Number: C1 901R

ENG 165 Speech (4) (4, 0)

Communication theory and practice of oral communication skills. The course develops awareness of the communication process, provides organizational and expressive strategies, promotes understanding and application of a variety of communication contexts, and emphasizes critical ability in the four language skills.

Prerequisite: ENG 160 IAI Course Number: C2 900

ENG 203 American Culture and Literature (4) (4, 0)

Practice and reinforcement of reading comprehension and cultural awareness through the study and analysis of American culture and literature. Topics include an overview of literary genres using representative works.

Prerequisites: ENG 160 or Placement at ENG 160 level.

IAI Course Number: H3 914

Health Information Technology

HIT 101 Introduction to Medical Billing (4) (4, 0)

In this course, students are provided a realistic record keeping experience for medical office assistants. Students enter data and work with information in patient files using a computerized patient billing and record keeping simulation. Legal and ethical issues involving billing and the submission of claims are discussed. Students will use real world examples and develop practical experience through billing experience.

Prerequisite: BIO 115 and ADM 101

HIT 109 Introduction to Medical Coding (4) (4, 0)

In this course, students practice applying coding skills acquired in the CPT manual and the ICD-9-CM manual. Students find medical codes for diseases, conditions, treatments, and surgical procedures and become skilled at determining patient diagnoses and procedures by coding patient medical records. The importance of supporting documentation for every code selected is covered. Legal and ethical issues involving coding and the submission of claims are discussed. Students become familiar with most of the main systems of the human body: integumentary (skin), musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and male and female genitourinary. Students will use real world examples and develop hands on experience through coding exercises that determine the correct codes to medical conditions.

Prerequisites: BIO 115 and ADM 101

HIS 104 Survey of United States History to 1865 (4) (4, 0)

This course studies the emergence of the United States as an independent country and the development of the institution of representative government. It includes major events, trends, and interpretation in American life.

IAI Course Number: S2 900

HIS 105 Survey of United States History from 1865 to Present (4) (4, 0)

This course surveys American history from the end of the Civil War to the present covering political and economic developments, and social, intellectual and cultural changes.

IAI Course Number: S2 901

HIS 205 History of Latin America (4) (4, 0)

This course is designed to introduce students to the people, places, culture and history of Latin America since 1800. It will focus on a series of countries and themes to provide a comparison as well as to emphasize the similarities of the Latin American historical experience. Themes include nationalism and identity, revolution and counterrevolution, populism, state formation, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, social movements, the role of foreign powers, inequality and social class, dictatorship, democratization, and human rights.

Prerequisites: None

*This course fulfills the Contemporary World Cultures OR Non-Western Culture global course requirement for Education majors.

Hospitality Management

HOS 311 Marketing and Tourism in the Hospitality Industry (4, 0)

This course will introduce the basic marketing concepts and skills for Hospitality and Tourism industries. The course will help students to understand, plan, create and implement marketing strategies for the Hospitality and Tourism industries. The course also will introduce students the most current applications and technologies to launch successful marketing campaigns for this unique and exciting industry. Prerequisite: CIS 301 and PSY 420

HOS 321 Legal Issues in Hospitality (4, 0)

This course will introduce the business law and regulatory system that affects the Hospitality industry. The course will familiarize the student with a practical knowledge of the current laws and legal regulations affecting the hospitality industry to run and operate a business successfully. This course also will help the student to use that knowledge to develop managerial policies and business practices to protect the business and reduce the impact of the legal system. Prerequisite: CIS 301 and PSY 420

HOS 455 Lodging in the Hospitality Industry (4, 0)

This survey course includes the history, scope, challenges and opportunities of the lodging industry from the smaller bed and breakfast to the largest facilities for international tourists and visitors, including front desk management, principles of customer service and business ambiance; facilities, technologies and systems; food & beverage service; sales and marketing; and federal, state and local laws affecting the lodging industry. Prerequisite: CIS 301 and PSY 420

HOS 466 Managing Food Service in the Hospitality Industry (4, 0)

This course explores the functions and challenges of food service operations. Students will learn how to develop and execute strategies in foodservice operations from feasibility, planning, marketing, and initiating operations. Students will learn how to enhance operational systems for purchasing, receiving, storage, menu design and layout, and methods to improve the customer experience.

Prerequisite: CIS 301 and PSY 420 and CUL 106 OR CUL 108

HOS 477 Managing Events in the Hospitality Industry (4, 0)

This course is a comprehensive study of the concepts, strategies, and methods for planning, organizing, developing, marketing, and operating meetings, conferences, and conventions. Students will participate in an event in cooperation with the faculty in order to fulfill the course requirements. Prerequisite: HOS 311 and HOS 321

HOS 488 Human Resources (4, 0)

Students learn key hospitality human resource management and organizational issues of a general, technical, and social nature including communication, motivation and leadership, job stress and safety, security, government regulations, discrimination, and disability issues. Students learn to identify common themes to solve problems and maximize efficiency and productivity in order to meet the needs of all stakeholders in the organization. Prerequisite: CIS 301 and PSY 420

HOS 495 Senior Seminar in the Hospitality Industry (4, 0)

This is the capstone course of the hospitality program which will allow students to explore a particular area of interest or specialty in the hospitality industry. Students will complete a study in the hospitality field during their internship of 200 hours under the guidance of the faculty.

Prerequisite: Any two HOS 400 level courses

Humanities

HUM 202 Humanities I (4) (4, 0)

This course is an introduction to Hispanic-American literature from the mythology of the pre-Columbian cultures through the Renaissance, Romanticism, and Modernism, which is called today’s “Magic Realism.” Emphasis will be placed on students’ efforts to write their own stories.

IAI Course Number: H3 917

HUM 204 Music Appreciation (4) (4, 0)

This course focuses on the development of the ability to analyze, classify, and respond to music, specifically vernacular music from the Americas and classical music from Europe and the Americas. This course will familiarize the student with the history of music, specifically from Western Europe and the Americas. There is a special focus on the music and composers of Latin America.

IAI Course Number: F1 900

HUM 205 History and Appreciation of Art (4) (4, 0)

The historical development of the visual arts (painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, and architecture) as they transmit cultural traditions and humanistic and aesthetic values. This course examines historical, social, and technological factors that contribute to understanding the function and meaning of works of art.

IAI Course Number: F2 900

Mathematics

MAT 101 Elementary Mathematics (4) (4, 0)

Topics include addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of common and mixed fractions and decimals, exponents and square roots, ratios, proportions; the arithmetic of signed numbers, and geometric concepts. Also included is an introduction to algebraic notation and linear equations, as well as, word problem applications.

Prerequisite: Placement Test

MAT 109 Mathematics for Cooks (2) (2, 0)

This course covers common mathematics requirements for Cooks. This course is designed to introduce the culinary art student to kitchen calculations, conversions and recipe costing. It also includes a review of basic operations, fractions, decimals, percent, ratios, and proportions. The International System of Measurements (Metric System), apothecary and household systems, construction and reading graphs are also included.

Prerequisite: NoneCo-requisite: CIS 109

MAT 110 Mathematics for Health Careers (4) (4, 0)

This course covers common mathematics requirements for the allied health field. The major topics for the course include a review of basic operations, fractions, decimals, percent, ratios and proportions. The International System of Measurements (Metric System), apothecary and household systems, systems conversions, construction and reading graphs are also included. Calculations needed to determine dosages and an introduction to statistics is covered as well. This course is recommended for Respiratory Therapy majors.

Prerequisite: MAT 101 or Placement Test

MAT 111 Business Mathematics (4) (4, 0)

The course offers analysis and solution of business problems in profit and loss, banking and credit card transactions, percentage, discount, payroll, simple and compound interest, installment transactions, depreciation, inventory and overhead, taxes, interpretation of financial reports and business statistics, and weight and volume measurements.

Prerequisite: MAT 101 or Placement Test

MAT 112 Intermediate Algebra (4) (4, 0)

The major topics of the course include basic terms and real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, exponents and polynomials, rational expressions, roots and radicals. Quadratic equations and inequalities, linear equations and inequalities in two variables, systems of linear equations and inequalities, matrices, and radical expressions and logarithms are also covered.

Prerequisite: MAT 101 or Placement Test

MAT 160 Precalculus (4) (4, 0)

This course provides students with the analytical abilities and required methods needed for a course on Calculus. The course integrates the major topics of College Algebra and Trigonometry in a straightforward approach that reinforces the role of these two areas in Calculus. Graphic calculators will be used as tools to motivate and enhance learning. (On demand)

Prerequisite: MAT 112 or Placement Test

MAT 199 Topics in Mathematics (1-4)

This course will review and expand the principles and concepts studied in MAT 101, MAT 110 or MAT 112 classes to allow students after its completion to satisfy the MAT requirement for some specific programs. (On demand)

Prerequisite: Departmental approval

MAT 200 Finite Mathematics (4) (4, 0)

This course is designed to provide the basic non-calculus mathematics needed by students in the areas of business and the social sciences. Major topics include set theory and Venn diagrams, logic systems of two and more equations, matrices, linear programming and its applications to social sciences problems, and probability and Bayes’ Theorem. (On demand)

Prerequisite: MAT 112 IAI Course Number: M1 906

MAT 201 College Algebra (4) (4, 0)

Topics include fundamental algebraic operations with real and complex numbers, functions, linear, quadratic, and systems of equations, inequalities, factoring, topics from the theory of equations, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions, the binomial theorem, partial fractions, and mathematical induction. (On demand)

Prerequisite: MAT 112 or Placement Test

MAT 225 Introductory Statistics (4) (4, 0)

This course is an introduction to statistics and probability. Major topics include introductory statistics, basic descriptive statistics including frequency distribution, mode, mean and standard deviation, permutations, combinations, probability rules and Bayes’ Theorem, as well as binomial and normal distributions. Basic inferential statistics including sampling theory, confidence intervals for means and proportions, and test of hypotheses, and chi-square distribution will also be reviewed. Correlation and regression are also included.

Prerequisite: MAT 112 or Placement Test IAI Course Number: MI 902

MAT 240 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (4) (4, 0)

This course introduces mathematical reasoning and strategies for problem solving. The major topics of the course include operations with rational and irrational numbers, set theory, functions, logic, numeration systems and number theory and graph and solving linear equations with one variable. Applications and problem-solving exercises with the use of calculators and computers are emphasized throughout the course. Writing assignments related with the discipline are also part of the course.

Prerequisite: MAT 112 or Placement Test

MAT 241 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (4) (4, 0)

This course is a continuation of MAT 240. The major topics of the course include probability and statistics, counting methods, lines, angles, polygons, Pythagorean Theorem, geometric figures, and systems of measurement. Applications and problem-solving exercises with the use of calculators and computers are emphasized throughout the course. Writing assignments related with the discipline are also part of the course.

Prerequisite: MAT 240 with a grade of C or better.

Philosophy

PHI 200 Introduction to Philosophy (4) (4, 0)

This course covers principles and problems of philosophy as seen in different schools of thought. The original works of such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, and Sartre will be analyzed. Topics include the validity of human knowledge, the nature of reality; mind and body; free will and determination; moral and aesthetic values; the existence of God and the significance of religious experience. Issues of professional ethics will be emphasized.

IAI Course Number: H4 900

PHI 201 Logic (4) (4, 0)

A study of the structure of logical thinking, including the validity of deductive and inductive reasoning. Attention is given to detecting fallacies and to examining the nature of scientific verification. A consideration of the methods of testing is also covered. The course is offered on demand.

IAI Course Number: H4 906

PHI 220 Ethics (4) (4, 0)

This course will provide an introduction to the study of ethics and its importance to the individual and society. It will introduce a model for making moral decisions, and will involve the students in the application of moral theories and principles to deal with specific moral dilemmas. It will emphasize issues of professional ethics.

Prerequisite: ENG 160 IAI Course Number: H4 904

Physical Sciences

PHY 101 Physical Science (4) (4, 0)

Basic principles and concepts of physics, chemistry, earth sciences and astronomy. Both lecture and class demonstrations are utilized in this course. (On demand).

IAI Course Number: P9 900

PHY 103 Earth Science (4) (4, 0)

Basic principles and concepts of environmental problems, including the ecosystem, human population, human health, renewable and nonrenewable resources, as well as chemical, physical and biological hazards. The impact of economic and political factors in the environment will also be reviewed. The course is offered on demand.

IAI Course Number: P1 905

Political Science

PSC 103 American Government and Politics (4) (4, 0)

Focus on the principles and practices of the American governmental system including the federal system, Congress, the President, the judiciary, the political and administrative process, including public policy.

IAI Course Number: S5 900

Psychology

PSY 101 General Psychology (4) (4, 0)

A general introduction to the study of psychology as a science. Areas of study include a historical survey of psychology, the study of the sensory and perceptual processes such as learning, thinking, remembering, emotional behavior, motivation, and mechanism of adjustment.

IAI Course Number: S6 900

IAI Major – Course Number: SPE 912

PSY 202 Human Growth and Development (4) (4, 0)

This course provides students with basic theories and principles of development, prenatal through adolescence with emphasis on the young child. It includes an in-depth study of physical, cognitive, psychosocial, language, and aesthetic development. The course examines theories of Piaget, Erickson, Freud, Vygotsky, Skinner, and others. It explores child development in the context of gender, family, culture, and society.

Prerequisite: PSY 101 or consent of department chairperson

IAI Course Number: S6 904

IAI Major – Course Number: EED 902/PSY 901/SPE 913

PSY 210 Child Psychology (4) (4, 0)

This course provides a “critical thinking” approach into basic theories, concepts and principles on Child Development from conception through early childhood. Students will study the physical, neurological, cognitive, psychosocial, moral, language, and aesthetic development of children and the interactive nature of these areas. We will examine developmental theories, emphasizing Piaget, Erikson, Freud, Vygotsky and others. Since human development can be greatly influenced by culture, cross-cultural comparisons and observations will be made throughout the course. Students will be performing observational tasks in order to assist learning gains.

Prerequisite: PSY 101 IAI Course Number: S6 903 (Equivalent to PSY 202/Equivalente a PSY 202)

PSY 220 Adult Development and Aging (4) (4, 0)

This course emphasizes an understanding of the important methods, terms, theories, and findings pertaining to the psychology of adulthood and aging. Students will review the major theories of adult development from early adulthood through seniors with emphasis on culture, cohorts, challenges and identity formation.

Prerequisites: PSY 101, PSY 202 or 210

PSY 234 Abnormal Psychology (4) (4, 0)

This course considers the major diagnostic, etiologic, prevention, and treatment issues for a variety of categories of abnormal behavior and psychological disorders. Students will be provided with basic information and knowledge on how mental professionals define (diagnose & assess), explain (etiology), and treat mental disorders from children to the elderly. Biological, psychosocial, and sociocultural origins of abnormal behavior will be examined and the role of research methods will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: PSY 202 or PSY 210.

IAI Major – Course Number: PSY 905

PSY 238 Social Psychology (4) (4, 0)

A systematic study of theory and research of social factors in individual and group behavior. Includes social perception, moderation and learning, attitudes, norms of influence processes, leadership, group dynamics and research methods, emphasizing their effects on the individual.

Prerequisite: PSY 202 or PSY 210 IAI Course Number: S8 900

PSY 270 Theories of Personality (4) (4, 0)

This course introduces and integrates theory and empirical research in regards to both normal and abnormal personality development and maintenance in a cultural context. Research methods and personality assessment in regards to psychoanalytic, neopsychoanalytic, trait, humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral/social learning theories will be reviewed.

Prerequisites: PSY 101, PSY 202 or 210

PSY 300 Cross-Cultural Factors in Mental Health (4) (4, 0)

This course includes ethnic and cultural considerations in mental health, the impact of cultural differences in the integration of a community, the identification of specific cultural beliefs and their impact on mental health and identity development.

Prerequisites: PSY 101, PSY 202 or 210

PSY 303 Domestic Violence: Theories and Practice (4) (4, 0)

Domestic Violence (DV) is endemic in our society. This course will focus on the foundations of domestic violence work, the occurrence of intrafamilial violence, and the treatment of violence as it is experienced by various family members. All issues and topics are considered within a historical and contemporary socio-cultural and political perspective. Special emphasis will be placed on the various epistemological conceptualizations of violence and abuse. This course will prepare a student to receive further training and certification in the area of domestic violence.

Prerequisites: PSY 101 or PSY 202 or 210, ENG 162, or permission of the department

PSY 310 Tests and Measurement (4) (4, 0)

Introduction to measurement theory and the statistical principles underlying the objective assessment of intelligence, personality traits, abilities and attitudes. In addition, issues of standardization, reliability and validity; limitations and abuses of test scores in evaluation and a review of the commonly used psychological tests will be covered.

Prerequisites: PSY 101, PSY 202 or 210

PSY 320 Behavioral Statistics (4) (4, 0)

Students will gain an appreciation and understanding of common quantitative analysis tools and techniques used in the behavioral sciences. Through reading and analysis of research publications, students will review commonly accepted statistical measure and their application to research.

Prerequisites: PSY 101, PSY 202 or 210, MAT 225

PSY 325 Cognitive Psychology (4) (4, 0)

This course examines cognitive processes including perception, memory, language and thinking. Students will develop an appreciation of the basic information in cognitive psychology, including both research and theory. Students will apply their knowledge to their own cognitive processes and development, and professional areas such as education, law, clinical psychology, and social relations.

Prerequisites: PSY 101, PSY 202 or 210

PSY 400 Abnormal Psychology (4) (4, 0)

This course considers the major diagnostic, etiologic, prevention, and treatment issues for a variety of categories of abnormal behavior and psychological disorders. Students will be provided with basic information and knowledge on how mental professional define, explain, and treat mental disorders from children to the elderly. Biological, psychosocial, and sociocultural origins of abnormal behavior will be examined and the role of research methods will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: PSY 270

PSY 410 Social Psychology (4) (4, 0)

This course is a systematic study of theory and research of social factors in individual and group behavior, including social perceptions, moderation and learning, attitudes, norms of influence processes, leadership, group dynamics, research methods, emphasizing their effects on the individual.

Prerequisite: PSY 270

PSY 420 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (4) (4, 0)

This course covers practical applications of psychology to problems of business and industry: work attitudes and behaviors; employee selectin; morale; safety; turnover; absenteeism; and training. It also examines psychological research and theory that relates to the following topics: personnel evaluation, personnel selection, personality and interest factors, equal employment opportunity, personnel training and work motivation, human factors in job design, and leadership.

Prerequisite: PSY 270

PSY 430 Gender and Society (4) (4, 0)

This course examines the impact of sex and gender roles on contemporary American society. Differentiation by sex is the central organizing principle of nearly every human society. The course will examine key issues of gender difference and inequality, including family life, paid work, economic status, violence, body image, sexuality, and reproduction. The course will examine men’s roles and women’s roles, treating gender as an interactive and dynamic concept.

PSY 450 Senior Seminar (4) (4, 0)

A Capstone Experience. The seminar will require senior psychology majors to reflect and explore the past, present, and future of an area of psychology in which they have an occupational interest. They will also explore themselves by identifying, clarifying and preparing to actualize their post-baccalaureate aspiration in an APA-style review paper about a particular area of psychology and create a professional planning portfolio.

Prerequisite: All but one of 300 level required psychology courses.

Respiratory Therapy

RES 100 Fundamentals of Respiratory Care (2) (3, 0)

Introduction to respiratory care with theoretical emphasis in principles of infection control, oxygen administration, aerosol and humidity therapy, chest physical therapy, analysis and monitoring of gas exchange and incentive spirometry devices.

Prerequisite: Cum. GPA of 2.67 in Prerequisite Courses (see pages 14, 64); Co-requisite: RES 120

RES 120 Respiratory Care Procedures I (2) (0, 3)

Laboratory experience in selecting, assembling, using and troubleshooting basic respiratory care equipment including: oxygen administration devices, humidifiers, inhalers, gas cylinders, regulators, reducing valves, flow meters, air oxygen blenders, mucous clearance devices, oximetry monitoring devices, incentive spirometry devices, among others.

Prerequisite: Cum. GPA of 2.67 in Pre-Respiratory Courses; Co-requisite: RES 100

RES 129 Clinical Practicum I (2) (0, 8)

Introduction to basic respiratory care procedures under direct clinical supervision in the patient care setting. Students develop their skills in patient assessment, oxygen therapy, aerosol and humidity therapy, pharmacological agents, and cardiac resuscitation. Students will be oriented to diagnostic monitoring, computerized charting, hospital safety and standards for infection control. 64 clinical contact hours.

Prerequisite: Cum. GPA of 2.67 in Pre-Respiratory courses.

RES 199 Topics in Respiratory Care (1)

This course will review the more important principles, concepts and topics studied in Cardio-Pulmonary Anatomy and Physiology (BIO 208), Applied Physics (AHP 110) and Respiratory Care Pharmacology (AHP 113). The course will help to improve the knowledge skills of students who are in process of getting admitted into the Respiratory Therapy program.

Prerequisite: Department consent

RES 201 Respiratory Care Pathology (2) (3, 0)

The acute and chronic cardio-respiratory pathological processes will be covered to include: pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Pulmonary function interpretation will be discussed.

Prerequisite: Cum. GPA of 2.67 in Pre-Respiratory Courses

RES 205 N.B.R.C. Seminar (2) (3, 0)

This course is intended to discuss, review, recall and analyze information regarding the didactic, laboratory and clinical areas of the Certified Respiratory Therapist (C.R.T) and Registered Respiratory Therapist (R.R.T) exams.

Prerequisites: RES 211, RES 230, RES 240, RES 250, and RES 249 or department consent.

RES 210 Mechanical Ventilation I (2) (3, 0)

Principles of mechanical ventilation including: Physiology of ventilatory support, indications, contraindications, complications and physiological effects of mechanical ventilation. Also included are the analysis of arterial blood gases, hemodynamic monitoring and assessment of patients on ventilators. Effective Spring 2005.

Prerequisite: Cum. GPA of 2.67 in Pre-Respiratory Courses Co-requisite: RES 220

RES 211 Mechanical Ventilation II (2) (3, 0)

This course provides students for an opportunity to integrate and develop the theoretical knowledge and skills necessary for the initiation, management, and weaning of mechanical ventilation. In addition, lecture topics include, different operating modes of mechanical ventilation, monitoring parameters and neonatal mechanical ventilation.

Prerequisite: RES 210

RES 212 Clinical Case Simulations (2) (3, 0)

This course prepares the student to review, recall and analyze basic and advanced information regarding clinical simulation cases for the Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) exam.

Prerequisites: RES 211, RES 230, RES 240, RES 250, and RES 249

RES 220 Respiratory Care Procedures II (2) (1, 2)

Integration of theoretical and laboratory experiences with emphasis on selecting, assembling, using and troubleshooting ventilators as well as ventilator monitoring and weaning techniques. This course also includes selection, assembly, use and troubleshooting of equipment including: IPPB ventilators, suctioning devices, vacuum systems, PEP devices, artificial airways, and patients breathing circuits.

Prerequisite: Cum. GPA of 2.67 in Pre-Respiratory Courses. Co-requisite: RES 210

RES 230 Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care (2) (3, 0)

An introduction to neonatal and pediatric respiratory care concepts including: placental and fetal circulation, cardiopulmonary events at birth, assessment of newborn, cardio-pulmonary disorders, basics of respiratory care and neonatal mechanical ventilation. (Formerly: RES 202)

Prerequisites: RES 100, RES 120, RES 201, RES 210, RES 220, RES 129, RES 239, and RES 249.

Co-requisite: RES 240

RES 239 Clinical Practicum II (2) (0, 8)

Continuation of basic respiratory care procedures under direct clinical supervision. Emphasis on development of new skills, including: airway management, nasotracheal suctioning, chest physiotherapy and hyperinflation therapy. 64 clinical contact hours.

Prerequisite: Cum. GPA of 2.67 in Pre-Respiratory courses.

RES 240 Respiratory Care Procedures III (2) (1, 2)

This course is a continuation of RES 220 through a systematic review of adult mechanical ventilations. Special emphasis is given to the difference between mechanical ventilation of the newborn and adult patient. Also introduces the student to special procedures like chest tubes.

Prerequisites: RES 100, RES 120, RES 201, RES 210, RES 220, RES 129, RES 239, and RES 249

Co-requisite: RES 230

RES 249 Clinical Practicum III (2) (0, 8)

Supervised clinical experience with emphasis in mechanical ventilation in the adult patient and introduction to critical care management. 128 clinical contact hours.

Prerequisite: Cum. GPA of 2.67 in previous semesters

RES 250 Hemodynamics and Cardiac Monitoring (2) (3, 0)

This course reinforces the concepts of cardiovascular anatomy and physiology discussed in previous respiratory courses. Emphasis on techniques and theory necessary for the interpretation and evaluation of hemodynamic measurements and hemodynamic monitoring.

Prerequisites: RES 100, RES 120, RES 201, RES 210, RES 220, RES 129, RES 239 and RES 249

RES 259 Clinical Practicum IV (2) (0, 8)

Clinical practice designed for the advanced respiratory student under direct clinical supervision. Introduction to basic respiratory care procedures and critical care management of neonates and pediatric patients. 224 clinical contact hours.

Prerequisites: RES 100, RES 120, RES 201, RES 210, RES 220, RES 129, RES 239, and RES 249

RES 280 Clinical Internship I (2) (0, 6)

The purpose of this independent clinical rotation experience is an opportunity for students to gain more practice in the collection, review, analysis and evaluation of non-critical patient data. It is also an opportunity for students to apply principles of equipment manipulation, infection control and quality control. 96 clinical contact hours.

Prerequisites: RES 100, RES 120, RES 201, RES 210, RES 220, RES 129 and RES 239

RES 290 Clinical Internship II (2) (0, 6)

The purpose of this independent clinical rotation experience is an opportunity for students to gain more practice in the management and monitoring of non-critically and critically ill patients. It is also an opportunity for students to determine the appropriateness of the prescribed respiratory care plan and recommend modifications when indicated. 96 clinical contact hours.

Prerequisites: RES 100, RES 120, RES 201, RES 210, RES 220, RES 129, RES 239 and RES 249

RES 300 Clinical Internship III (2) (0, 6)

The purpose of this independent clinical rotation experience is an opportunity for students to integrate and develop all clinical competencies and skills learned in previous supervised and non-supervised clinical practices. 96 clinical contact hours.

Prerequisites RES 100, RES 120, RES 201, RES 210, RES 220, RES 129, RES 239 and RES 249

Sociology

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology (4) (4, 0)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts, theories, and methods of sociology – which is the study of human behavior within and among groups, cultures, communities, and social organizations. The course will examine human interactions and how people are influenced by various factors, including economics and poverty, technological change, mass media, international development, and globalization. Students will understand the major sociological perspectives – symbolic interactionism, conflict, and function, in order to understand how social interactions are influenced by image, roles, values, gender, race, ethnicity, class, etc. Students will also learn how social policy is related to a society’s view of itself and its members.

IAI Course Number: S7 900

SOC 208 Introduction to the Analysis of Social Problems (4) (4, 0)

In this course, emphasis is placed on how social problems originate as well as on ways to determine causality and social problem solving. The problems studied range from local to international. The course is offered on demand.

Prerequisite: SOC 101 IAI Course Number: S7 901

SOC 210 Marriage and Family (4) (4, 0)

Investigation of American family functions and structures through cross-cultural, historical, and institutional analysis. Sociological theory and current research used to explore mate selection, marital adjustment, child rearing, post-parental years, and problems related to American marriages. The course is offered on demand.

Prerequisite: SOC 101 IAI Course Number: S7 902

Spanish

SPA 101 Elementary Reading, Writing and Oral Expression (4) (4, 0)

Introduction to Spanish-as-a-Second-Language including development of basic reading, writing, oral skills, and elementary grammar. (On demand)

SPA 105 Intermediate Reading, Writing, and Oral Expression (4) (4, 0)

Development of reading comprehension of complex texts and the ability to write through summary preparation and compositions. Practice in the use of intermediate-level grammar. (On demand)

Prerequisite: SPA 101, or Placement Test

SPA 109 Advanced Reading, Writing, and Oral Expression (4) (4, 0)

Practice of reading comprehension of complex texts and the ability to write summaries, reports and essays. The course includes a review of Spanish grammar (using grammar reference sources) to improve oral and written expression. (On demand)

Prerequisite: SPA 105, or Placement Test

SPA 201 Grammar and Composition for Bilinguals (4) (4, 0)

For Spanish-dominant students and students who have passed SPA 109. Systematic review of Spanish grammar and spelling, development of reading comprehension and the ability to write paragraphs, reports and expository essays. Introduction to the research paper. (On demand)

Prerequisite: Entry by Placement Test or permission of the Department.

SPA 202 Advanced Composition (4) (4, 0)

Development and practice of the ability to prepare written documents (reports, memos, research papers) with attention to content, language, and format (APA or MLA). Practice in the use of reference guides, dictionaries, and grammars in the preparation of texts. (On demand)

Prerequisite: Entry by Placement Test or permission of the Department.

SPA 222 The Hispanic-American Experience through Literature (4) (4, 0)

This course covers the development of Hispanic-American societies from their beginnings to the multi-ethnic character that marks them today. Emphasis will be given to the relationship between Europe and America and its consequences on major authors and literary works.

Prerequisite: Entry by Placement Test or permission of the Department.

IAI course Number: H3 910D

SPA 245 Hispanic Literature of the 20th Century (4) (4, 0)

A survey of the literary movement and trends that followed the generation of 1898; analysis of selected works and discussion of writers who rose to prominence in the 20th Century. (On demand)

Prerequisite: Entry by Placement Test or permission of the Department.

IAI Course Number: H3 917

SPA 250 Hispanic American Literature/Contemporary Fiction (4) (4, 0)

Reading and analysis of contemporary short stories and novels of Latin America with special emphasis on their techniques and themes. Authors and nations are selected according to their representative character. (On demand)

Prerequisite: Entry by Placement Test or permission of the Department.

IAI Course Number: H3 916

Social Work

SWK 200 Introduction to Social Work (4) (4, 0)

This course introduces students to the development of social work and social welfare policy and services, beginning with the English Poor Laws up to contemporary social welfare issues related to globalization. Students will also be introduced to the NASW Code of Ethics, the basic conceptual models of generalist social work practice, and a sampling of fields of practice for generalist practitioners today. This course emphasizes writing and fulfills the College’s computer literacy requirement. (Formerly SWK 190 )

Prerequisite: AA degree or 10 general education courses including ENG 162, BIO 102, PSY 101 or SOC 101.

SWK 305 Ethics and Values in Social Work (4) (4, 0)

This course will build upon the material presented in SWK 200 Introduction to Social Work. The course will introduce students to the NASW Code of Ethics and major concepts, dilemmas and themes that affect daily social work and that have particular relevance to social work, such as processes of individual and social change, the biopsychosocial perspective, diversity, the development of empathy and judgment in conditions of uncertainty, and decision-making under conditions of scarce resources. The course will challenge students to consider their personal values and how to think critically when considering ethical issues and dilemmas, and how those may affect practice within the context of generalist practice. (Formerly SWK 202)

Prerequisite: AA degree or 10 general education courses including ENG 162, BIO 102, PSY 101, or SOC 101.

SWK 315 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I (4) (4, 0)

In this course students will explore human growth and behavior from conception to adolescence. The major dimensions studied are biological, psychological and social development. Environmental influences from the mezzo and macro levels are studied as they shape, act upon and affect human lives. Multiple influences of culture, race, racism, gender, sexual orientation and sexism are introduced and considered in relation to course of life. Theoretical perspectives such as strengths, ecological systems, empowerment, organizational theory and community change models are analyzed and applied to human behavior.

Prerequisite: AA degree or 10 general education courses including ENG 162, BIO 102, PSY 101 or SOC 101.

SWK 319 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II (4) (4, 0)

Five theories form the basis for this course. This course uses ecological-systems theory, social conflict theory and structural functionalism from sociology, interdisciplinary theory, and adult attachment theory. These theories are combined with current research regarding adult development and problems of adult life. Using these theories and critical thinking, students study the multidimensional risk factors and protective factors for 9 challenges of living that social workers are often called on for intervention. A working model and the bio-psychosocial-spiritual perspective is used to focus on the intersection between life stage, life challenges, and the macro, mezzo, and micro factors that contribute to risk and protection and shape a unique outcome for each person. A systemic focus on protective factors requires that students understand the functioning of social institutions, organizations, communities, and small groups as well as spiritual resources that impact families and individuals. Students will gain knowledge of contemporary issues in adult development in relation to challenging life events during adulthood. The course prepares students for informed advocacy in relation to social justice and well-being for vulnerable people. The course prepares students for an empathetic understanding of the complications of human behavior, behavior change during adulthood, and resilience.

Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 305, and SWK 315. Acceptance into the BSW upper level courses.

*BSW Exception: Students who have a 3.0 GPA or above may takeSWK 315 and/or SWK 305 along with SWK 319 if necessary as long as other admission requirements are met and the student is given permission by a SWK advisor or the chair. This allows students who demonstrate higher academic skills some flexibility if loss of financial aid is a concern. However, no student will be allowed to take SWK 345, 355, 335, 410, or 420 along with 315 or 305 because of the need to have a good foundation in social work principals (from SWK 200, 305 and 315) before taking other upper level courses.

SWK 325 Social Welfare Policy and Services (4) (4, 0)

The purpose of this course is to introduce content on current social welfare services and policies in the United States within a global context. Students will explore, analyze, and critique major social policies, including social insurance and assistance, health care, child welfare, and criminal justice. The course will discuss how the delivery of service is impacted by funding, organizations, and political concerns. The course will emphasize the issues of poverty, racism, sexism, globalization, and inequality; with a corresponding focus on justice and human rights. Students will engage in a learning process of advocacy that is consistent with social work values. (Formerly:SWK 240) (Elective, offered on demand)

Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 305, and SWK 315. Acceptance into the BSW upper level courses.

SWK 331 Case Studies in Generalist Practice (2) (2, 0)

This two-credit-hour elective course has been designed to increase student knowledge of generalist practice while improving writing skills. Students will read several case studies, provide written responses to the studies, and share their responses in class. The case studies include scenarios at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Students will also participate in a role play for an intake appointment and then produce a progress note using the S.O.A.P. format. In addition to a basic review of elements of grammar and composition, the instructor will provide feedback to the students on how to improve their writing skills.

Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 305, and SWK 315. Acceptance into the BSW upper level courses.

SWK 333 Social Work and Aging (2) (2, 0)

This two-credit-hour elective course will engage the student in the exploration of the bio-psychosocial aspects of aging. Quality of life issues involving older adults—i.e., health, income, housing, retirement, social services—will be explored. Ageism—attitudes, values, myths, prejudices, and stereotypes toward the aged—will be critically analyzed and addressed. Aging will be studied in the context of a culturally diverse society in terms of class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation. Students will be challenged to consider the implications for practice with the elderly population of theoretical learning accomplished in the classroom. (Elective, offered on demand)

Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 305, and SWK 315. Acceptance into the BSW upper level courses.

SWK 335 Social Justice and Social Action (4) (4, 0)

The primary focus of this course is to explore macro theory and generalist practice with a global perspective that utilizes the Just Practice Framework. The course includes content on understanding and assessing power, law, history, and the ways in which people experience oppression and discrimination. Students will gain an understanding of how to assess relationships between and among groups, communities, organizations, and social systems through six core processes with the focus of addressing and overcoming social injustice. Students will also self-reflect on their personal experiences, social positions and values in an attempt to better engage macro practice systems. (Formerly:SWK 250)

Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 305, and SWK 315. Acceptance into the BSW upper level courses.

SWK 337 Child Welfare Policy (2) (2, 0)

This two-credit-hour elective course is designed to provide an introduction to the current policies governing child welfare practice in the state of Illinois. Historical background will be included in order to understand child welfare policy today. The development of policy will be examined in relation to societal definitions of the needs of children and families, with a focus on vulnerable and high-risk groups. The course will also include discussion on the values, rights, and responsibilities of the state, the community, and the family. (Elective, offered on demand)

Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 305, and SWK 315. Acceptance into the BSW upper level courses.

SWK 338 Child Welfare Practice (2) (2, 0)

This two-credit-hour elective course follows SWK 337. Having acquired an understanding of the role and values of current child welfare policy, students will be introduced to how policy is manifested in programs and services. Students will learn current perspectives regarding child abuse and neglect, and the role of the law and child welfare agencies in responding to these problems. Students will also become familiar with foster care, guardianship, and adoption services. Culturally competent practice and other issues related to race, culture, ethnicity, gender issues, and socio-economic status will also be discussed.(Elective, offered on demand)

Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 305, and SWK 315. Acceptance into the BSW upper level courses.

SWK 345 Multicultural Social Work Practice (4) (4, 0)

This course will involve an exploration of social work in the context of a culturally diverse society. Students will explore the meaning of cultural competence in relation to social work practice in the United States and the world. This will include discussing the need for social workers to embark on a life long journey toward cultural competence through knowledge, skills and self-awareness. Students will examine the meaning and dimensions of culture, race, ethnicity, racism, prejudice, oppression, assimilation versus acculturation, and bias in service delivery. Additionally, students will study critical issues in social work practice including sexual orientation, gender, class, religion and ability. Populations will be studied in the context of economic, historical, political, and social forces that impact these groups. Students will be challenged to consider empirically based theories as they relate to culturally competent social work.

Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 305, and SWK 315. Acceptance into the BSW upper level courses.

SWK 355 Research and Practice Evaluation (4) (4, 0)

This course will cover basic and applied research concepts and methodology, statistics, and how to interpret research published in professional literature related to social work. Students will learn methods to evaluate their practice and develop a critical perspective to social work methods in order to improve their practice. The course will cover basic issues of research including ethics and informed consent, bias, developing research questionnaires, qualitative and quantitative designs, sampling, measurement, and analysis of data. (Formerly:SWK 308)

Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 305, and SWK 315. Acceptance into the BSW upper level courses.

SWK 410 Social Work Practice I (4)

This course will offer learners the skills to engage ethically and collaboratively in general level social work practice. These skills are the basis for all social work jobs at the bachelor’s level, for continuation in a master’s level social work program, for effective case management practice, individual supportive counseling and for community-centered work in social work. Using active listening and strength-based interviewing skills students will actively participate in case simulations and apply problem-solving techniques with the goal of empowering those they serve. Students will practice case management with voluntary and involuntary clients, and those in crisis. Students will learn to conduct comprehensive assessments of individuals (micro level) and communities (macro level), and learn to evaluate their effect on each other using the ecological systems perspective and an interactive practice model. Learners will engage in evidence based practice methods as those apply to case management, supportive strength based counseling, and community assessment. Social work practice evaluation skills are applied in the context of individual case management tasks.

Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 305, and SWK 315. Acceptance into the BSW upper level courses.

SWK 420 Social Work Practice II (4)

This course builds on the general practice model emphasized in SWK 410 Social Work Practice I. In this course students continue to extend the skills learned in the Social Work Practice I course to social work with families and groups. Students will apply family systems theory and theories of group dynamics to families and groups, and to professional use of self as a social worker. Students will learn to think critically about family definitions, and empowerment and strengths based practice within contexts that include interacting cultures, social injustice, and both public and private resources to meet the needs of people. They will learn how varying stages of the family life cycle and varying social conditions change the intervention plan. Students continue to learn about evidence based practice and practice evaluation as they did in SWK Practice I. Students will continue preparation for the social work practicum by learning how to work effectively within organizational structure and under supervision. Students will be able to apply the Social Work Code of Ethics to the process of intervention with families and groups. They will learn to prepare themselves for continuing education and lifelong professional learning by identifying personal learning needs.

Prerequisites: SWK 200, SWK 305, and SWK 315. SWK 410 is a prerequisite or Co-requisite. Acceptance into the BSW upper level courses.

SWK 450 Field Instruction I (4) (1, 14)

This course is the initial experience for the student to begin working as a social worker. This course and SWK 460 require a minimum of 210 hours (each semester) of supervised social work experience at a field site. Once the student has a field contract and has been oriented to the agency’s mission, organization, and its services, the student will begin the internship, offering general social work services under supervision by an experienced social worker. During the semester the student will work with the site supervisor and begin to develop his or her skills, knowledge, and competency. The student should learn basic skills in assessment, treatment plans intervention, and referral. The student should grow in understanding of the generalist approach from the strengths perspective, biopsychosocial perspective, and using ecological-systems perspectives. The student should also learn about the mission and functions of the local agency and its relationship to governmental bodies, social policy, and funding sources. The student will be evaluated at the end of the semester and a passing grade will be required to continue the course sequence.

Prerequisites: Department Approval, SWK 200 through 420, no more than one semester of elective work left to complete (3 courses max), and 2.75 GPA. (Exceptions: Students with a GPA of 3.0 or above may be allowed to take one core social work course while completing their internship and the 470 seminar.)

SWK 460 Field Instruction II (4) (1, 14)

This course continues the work begun in SWK 450. The student will be expected to deepen and improve the learning begun in the first semester. This semester also requires 210 hours of work at the field site. In addition to improving one’s skills and knowledge, students may also be working on issues of termination with clients and staff, utilizing supervision more successfully, and reflecting about one’s own values, skills, and professional development. Successful completion of the field experience is required for graduation.

Prerequisites: Departmental Approval, SWK 200 through 420 completed, no more than one semester of elective work left to complete (3 courses max), and 2.75 GPA. [Exceptions: Students with a GPA of 3.0 or above may be allowed to take one core social work course (SWK 335 – SWK 420) while completing their internship and the 470 seminar.]

SWK 470 Integrative Seminar (4) (4, 0)

This is the capstone course of the social work degree program. The purpose of the seminar is to assist the student in synthesizing theory and knowledge with field practice in order to better understand and improve one’s practice. This class will utilize case studies, journaling, and leadership of a study group to assist students to improve their competency in all practice standards. Students will also reflect on their development as social workers and understand how their practice is impacted by their sense of self and personal values. More in depth study of the NASW code of ethics is also included. Students participate actively in the seminar and share their knowledge and experience with their classmates in order to understand, integrate, and develop as generalist-practice social workers.

Co-requisite: SWK 450 or SWK 460

Prerequisites: Department Approval, SWK 200 through 420 completed, 2.75 GPA, no more than one semester of elective work left to complete (3 courses max).

(Exceptions: Students with a GPA of 3.0 or above may be allowed to take one core social work course (SWK 335-SWK 420) while completing their internship and this seminar.

SWK 498 Topics in Social Work I (1)

Independent study course. This course is designed to allow students to pursue areas of study in social work which are relevant to the completion of the SWK degree. This course is offered on request. Projects may be supervised by any social work faculty but must be approved by the department chair.

SWK 499 Topics in Social Work II (2)

Independent study course. This course is designed to allow students to pursue areas of study in social work which are relevant to the completion of the SWK degree. This course is offered on request. Projects may be supervised by any social work faculty but must be approved by the department chair.